Tag Archives: Vietnamese

Ba’get – New Tapas Menu

Amidst a flurry of events in March, I ventured to Ba’get (by myself) to try their new tapas menu.

A slightly rainy night led me to drive in and so I couldn’t try their awesome sounding cocktails. I enjoy any Asian flavoured cocktail with mint so I think I would automatically give this Mekong Breeze (mint, ginger beer, rum & more) a thumbs up just looking at it.

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There was an endless amount of food but what was different about this event was the chance for the public to buy tickets, whilst the boss, Duy Huynh, sat and ate throughout the whole night with us. I appreciated this personal touch and the welcoming of a two-way conversation with customers.

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The emphasis of the night was authenticity and to get feedback from us. I met another blogger, Wandering Mint (Minty), who I had not met before. We are both Vietnamese so we were interested to see how we would judge the authenticity of dishes.

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Some tapas dishes did not feel solely Vietnamese but were nevertheless done well such as the salt and pepper whitebait, salt and pepper calamari, prawn twists and sweet potato fries.

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In fact the sweet potato fries were quite popular as they had a very subtle chilli flavour to add a bit of excitement to the aftertaste. They came with chilli mayonnaise, which I would prefer a bit spicier, but I understand it needs to suit everyone’s tastes.

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A great, authentic idea that worked was the DIY rice paper rolls, but I believe they will come prerolled when launched instore.

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Although normal to Minty and myself, it took the customers some practice to get used to the art of rolling your own rice paper roll. A common mistake is to put too many noodles as it doesn’t look like enough – but trust me, keep on adding more ingredients and it will fall apart on your first bite! So don’t go too overboard on the carbs.

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‘Authentic’ is perhaps not the most accurate word to use, as everyone’s family has their own recipes and style. With his dad growing up selling banh mi in Vietnam, and his parents then coming to Melbourne and running bakeries for many years, it’s no surprise that Duy has taken his mother’s recipes to share with the public, and crowd-pleasing ones at that.

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The rice paper rolls used grilled lemongrass pork, not a meat I use often at home for this (we use beef), but the seasoning and BBQ taste of the pork ensured it worked well.

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I felt a little pressure to roll a good roll as a Vietnamese person, but didn’t do too badly. It also comes served with the classic dark, sweet sauce with peanuts and with a good amount of chilli in it too.

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The chicken wings are a classic at Vietnamese parties, with a crunchy and crispy exterior. This version had a coating light enough so that it didn’t feel too unhealthy.

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The spring rolls were longer and thinner than what I’m used to, but also used ingredients with a difference – pork and taro! Despite this, they were crunchy and delicious wrapped in lettuce and dipped in the traditional fish sauce.

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An innovative dish of the night was the goi or Vietnamese coleslaw, which was served with prawn crackers. The idea was to eat the crackers with the coleslaw in it – this is not unheard of, but you don’t often see it in restaurants or at home in my case.

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Personally I would have preferred a bit more fish sauce on the salad, but I think I would enjoy any Vietnamese food drenched in it…perhaps representative of Vietnamese people’s love for strong flavours.

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The meatball dish or nem nuong had a bit more added flavouring than your everyday skewers that you see at festivals. It had a juicy and mouthwatering marinade and was a good finish to the  main dishes.

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I was happy to see Vietnamese iced coffee as a feature, although you can get this at many places. Still, the sweetness of the condensed milk and immense flavour of the coffee ensures that you can’t go wrong with it.

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Something I don’t really see in Vietnamese influenced restaurants is the cassava cake as a sweet offering. It has a subtle coconut taste and the texture is a bit stickier and more glutinous than a sponge cake – but I love it. I think this will be interesting to introduce to Melburnians.

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There was also some sweet bread, which I don’t think I’ve tried before. The flavour does not standout, so a customer suggested a dip to go with it. But it demonstrates how Ba’get strives to make fresh food and bakes their bread daily.

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Ba’get will introduce their tapas menu on Friday and Saturday nights in addition to their already-popular lunch service, with the likes of banh mi (baguettes) and vermicelli bowls as a gluten free option.

With the street/hawker theme of the decor, Ba’get is aiming to immerse customers in a Vietnamese environment. My friend enjoys the banh mi from the Russell St store and is also Vietnamese – it’s probably one of the better banh mi shops in the CBD.

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The tapas is a mixture of traditional and modern elements, meanwhile drawing from Duy’s mother’s recipes. It’s a great way to introduce Vietnamese cuisine and culture to those who are not familiar with it, so why not introduce it to someone you know?

Ba’get has two store locations – 132 Russell St and 284-294 Latrobe St (corner Latrobe and Elizabeth St ). This event was held at the second location. They have new stores to come in Watergardens and Werribee.

Ba'get on Urbanspoon

Mon’s Adventures was invited as a guest of Ba’get, all opinions are my own.

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Asian Cheap Eats

Let’s admit it, there will always be a time when you crave cheap Asian food. I recently got to meet Kenny from the popular Western suburbs’ blog, Consider the Sauce, and we discussed how many people review the same popular places in the CBD etc, whilst he tends to go for the ‘ghetto’ places.

He makes a good point, and I enjoy weaving in and out of both worlds, or simply anywhere. My love of roadtrips leads me all over Melbourne and I love being able to have readers say, “That’s just near me, I’ll drop by and give it a try” whether it’s in the western or south-eastern suburbs (neither of which are my areas)!

So, here’s a few cheap Asian finds that I’ve stopped by in the various suburbs of Melbourne in the past few weeks. Enjoy!

Basil House: 461 High St, Preston
A mix of Vietnamese and Thai food, Basil House likes to provide a bit of variety. Due to the offering of both cuisines though, I feel like they lose a bit of authenticity in both areas.20140610_191050

But it satisfies the tummy and the craving, so most of the time it will do. The table settings are like any other Asian restaurant with cutlery and condiments on the table ready to go.

Decor is nothing special but at least this place isn’t cramped like some fast restaurants. It’s a little less hectic and more relaxed, but your food still comes out quickly.

20140610_191959High St is the busy, fast-ethnic-food-place-to-be in Preston. With a few other Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants on the little strip, you might pass by Basil House due to its split between two cuisines, which usually indicates it is catering too much to Western crowds by serving Asian dishes in general.
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We ordered some Vietnamese entrees including nem nuong (grilled pork, top picture) and bo la lot (beef wrapped in betel leaf, above) to start. The serves are suitable for sharing but I found the meat in both dishes a little dry.

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I think when you go to a cheap Asian restaurant, it’s all about ordering that one, complete, cheap meal and leaving satisfied. Com tam or broken rice (above) is a popular Vietnamese meal with grilled pork, shredded pork skin, egg and a sort of meatloaf with egg. It’s not pretty, but it is a staple meal at Vietnamese restaurants.

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We also ordered a large tom yum soup, although a little oily, it was surprisingly not bad. It was pretty warming and spicy for a winter night’s meal.

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My friend ordered one of the stir-fried chicken dishes, but I’m not sure which one. The chicken had a nice, light sauce whilst the vegies were cut in large chunks like most Asian restaurants.

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I chose the pad thai, which was better than my expectations and quite filling. I think they went a little overboard with the peanuts and towards the end, the flavour does feel a bit repetitive and bland, but I still managed to down it all.

Basil House is open everyday 10.30am-10.30pm. You can find an old version of their menu here as their website seems to be expired.

Basil House on Urbanspoon

Tra Vinh: 70 Nicholson St, Footscray
There are plenty of places to eat in the west, so a lot of people tend to overlook Tra Vinh. This visit actually made us realise that they don’t even have pho on the menu.

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But that’s not what this place is good for! To start off we ordered some classic Vietnamese drinks, a Vietnamese iced coffee and an avocado smoothie ($3 each). My iced coffee was a little small, but considering how strong Vietnamese coffees are, it was probably for the better at night time!

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What my friend loves this place for is their hu tieu mi kho dac biet, special dry Vietnamese pork noodles (apologies for blurry photo above). The noodles and various fillings are hiding underneath those beanshoots, which you can mix altogether with the sweet chilli sauce throughout to help flavour the dry noodles. It was so addictive, my friend ordered another bowl – and why not when it’s only $9.50.

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Hu tieu can also come in a soup base, so I went with the same dish but in a soup version. It has both clear noodles and egg noodles. The broth was welcoming, tasting like a great homemade soup. They have plenty of other dishes too, but they seem to mostly be known for their hu tieu dishes.

Tra Vinh is open daily 9am-8pm. Check out their menu on Urbanspoon.

Tra Vinh on Urbanspoon

Hoa Tran: 246A Springvale Rd, Springvale
This place is always busy and boasts a large menu. Another bustling Vietnamese suburban area, Springvale is home to many restaurants and shops to embrace your inner Asian. It has everything from bubble tea to pho, so whilst you’re there, don’t forget to check out Hoa Tran. Click the picture below for full article.

Hoa Tran is open daily from 9am-9pm. Check out their menu here.

Hoa Tran on Urbanspoon

Modern Asian Restaurants: Rice Paper Scissors

I walked past this place on my visit to Longrain, a new and upcoming place it was immediately put on my list of places to go. It was always going to be a risk though, with a modern take on various Asian and a lot of Vietnamese dishes, it would definitely challenge my notion of traditional Vietnamese food.

However, I’m very open to modern Asian restaurants as long as they provide dishes that taste good! It looked busy inside when we arrived around 6.30pm on a weeknight, so we chose to sit outside in true Asian hawker style with a wooden crate table. Service started off well and we chose to have the tempting offer of five dishes from the menu for $45 all up. 20140226_185001 The first dish that came out included two mini versions of banh xeoa take on the traditional Vietnamese pancake ($9, above). The English name said coconut crispy wafers filled with pork, prawn, bean shoots and fresh herbs, thus it was definitely crispier than the usual folded, large pancake.

The waiter recommended we eat it wrapped in the lettuce, which is a hard feat when the wafer is hard, but I managed by folding it up similar to a taco. This results in a messy, saucy meal but the crunch of lettuce and wafer, and the filling, provided a tasty mix of familiar Asian flavours yet something new. My friend wasn’t entirely happy when she decided not to use the lettuce and the waiter told her she should eat it with it, as it would be hard to eat otherwise. A recommendation is welcome, but being told you are eating the food wrong feels slightly rude. 20140226_185449 We didn’t take it too personally and moved on to our galloping horses, a Thai dish called ma hor, involving caramelised pork, prawn and peanut on sour pineapple ($9, above). From reviews, it seems like this is a favourite of many. I don’t usually like pineapple, but the taste of sour pineapple was easy to eat. The mix of filling on top sounds good on paper, but didn’t quite do it for us. The mix tasted a bit weird and salty and you don’t quite recognise what you are eating, but I guess it works for a lot of other people.

We also ordered a non-alcoholic drink, a crush of cranberry, lime and coriander ($6.50, above). Refreshing as it was, it had a bit of an odd aftertaste but it was not too bad and helped to cool down if you had too much chilli. I hear their cocktails are pretty good though so you can check out their drinks menu here. 20140226_194359 From this point, the small restaurant became full and I heard visitors being told it would be a 45 minute wait. Impressive for a new place, but at the same time our meal encountered an extremely long break.

After some prompts and apologies, our next dish of prawn crackers, using the Indonesian style and name, krupuk udang ($8, above) arrived. It came with king prawn, spicy sausage, soy caviar and sriracha mayo atop the large crackers. I discovered how tasty Indonesian prawn crackers are last year, as they’re larger, crunchier and more flavoursome but the presentation of scattered ingredients felt a bit random. It did taste quite good with the hints of chilli mayo, but it’s nothing amazing, especially after you’ve been waiting so long for it.

20140226_195445 Finally we had the mini Vietnamese baguettes, or banh mi ($9, above). It comes with free range bbq pork, pickled vegetables, herbs and homemade pate. I was dubious as they merely looked like mini hamburgers, but this was forgotten after I took a bite – the soft bread and pate burst with unique, inviting flavours.

For our fifth meal, they mistakenly brought out the coconut wafers again and not our betel leaves with duck. The wait was so long after that, we decided to leave and pay for four dishes. The waiter slightly apologised and rounded off our bill, however thought it was partially our fault for not correcting him when he had tried to check what we were waiting on. He had spoken quickly and we nodded because we assumed he was just asking if we were still waiting for dishes – and I’m not sure it’s our fault that they did not tick off the correct dishes.

Some of the food was impressive but weighed up against the long wait and service, I won’t be in a rush to come back. I didn’t leave full and don’t think I would have been, even after a fifth dish. But feel free to give it a try for some small bites and drinks, the food impresses many and you might experience better service than me!

Rice Paper Scissors is open Mon-Fri 12-3pm for lunch and 6pm-late for dinner. They are open 5pm-late on Saturdays and closed on Sundays. View their menu here.

Rice Paper Scissors on Urbanspoon

Authentic Vietnamese Spots

As a person of Vietnamese background, I would voice the usual opinion that a mother’s cooking is better compared to eating (Vietnamese food) out.

But when I do happen to eat out, here’s a few places that I’d recommend. To try authentic Vietnamese food, you’ll have to leave all preferences for atmosphere and ambience at the door. If you’re looking for good Vietnamese food, that’s what you’re going to get – no frills attached.

Pho Hung Vuong: Shop 2/15 Balmoral Avenue, Springvale

A favourite and popular joint amongst the shops in Springvale, this place is small but always packed and busy.

My parents once said if you’re going to eat pho out, you have to eat it at a shop that specialises in pho for it to be good (ie. not serve much else). Another thing they’ve taught us is that it’s all about the soup.

It’s always been a challenge to find pho that tastes just as good as my mum’s and I do feel that it is because of the fragant, flavoursome soup. However, Pho Hung Vuong proves that it is possible. I believe it’s because they brew their broth the same way that anyone would do at home, with various bones and herbs simmering in it, and have happened to figured out a consistent combination to satisfy the masses. On the other hand, my mum’s can taste a bit different every time.

It looks like your typical quick and straightforward Asian restaurant. You go in, sit down, order your meal and it will come out in a matter of minutes. It has the usual pho options (chicken, beef, beef balls) and I almost always go for the pho dac biet (special pho, above). The sizes generally range from about $7 or $8 up to $10.

There’s very little difference in price but in terms of size, even a small is generous enough to fill you up. Special pho has a little bit of everything – beef slices, tendon, tripe…I find that it is the solution to indecisiveness when ordering pho.

Pho is such a warming food, quite literally and figuratively. You know you will receive it quickly when you’re hungry, and it will be filling and of good quality at Hung Vuong. The soup is full of flavour, slightly sweet, and then everyone has their own preference of how to eat it thereon. Me? I enjoy a touch of chilli sauce, as much lemon as I can squeeze and lots of beanshoots and herbs. Pretty much everything I can to ensure it’s packed with flavour and exudes a pleasant and fragrant smell.

According to Urbanspoon, Pho Hung Vuong is open everyday. I don’t doubt this as I’ve even dropped in on public holidays to satisfy my pho cravings.

Pho Hung Vuong 2 on Urbanspoon

Song Huong: 71 Alfrieda St, St Albans

Who knew I could talk about pho for so long? Well if pho is all you associate with Vietnamese food, think again. We like our noodle soups and have a wide variety, so don’t be afraid to try the other ones. Each dish has a distinct taste, so I’ll let you in on two more.

Song Huong is similar to Pho Hung Vuong in that it is typically bland in decor as most fast, Asian places are. However, when seated you will be presented with an extensive menu of rice and noodle dishes. Their restaurant is also much larger, the size of two small shops combined, plus some outdoor seating.

On this occasion, I ordered bun rieu (top picture, bottom dish), a crab and tomato vermicelli noodle soup often with ingredients such as tofu and Vietnamese ham. I’ve tried my friend’s mum’s version of this dish and enjoyed it, thus was looking forward to having it at this popular westside restaurant.

It looked delicious, but I felt the soup was not as strong as what I’m used to. The flavour felt a little diluted compared to what I’ve had. Perhaps it could have had a bit more of a tomato taste. I can’t say it was bad, because without something to compare it to, I would probably enjoy it without a doubt. This is merely a case of it not tasting as good as a homemade meal!

I also ordered an avocado smoothie, a popular Vietnamese drink that I actually only discovered in Sydney. It tasted fresh, smooth and rich in avocado flavour, but for some reason I have a feeling the Sydney one tasted it better!

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Just as Pho Hung Vuong is known for their pho, Song Huong is apparently quite well-known for it’s bun bo hue (above), a spicy beef noodle soup, using thicker, cylindrical noodles. This time, I felt like I couldn’t leave without trying their specialty.

A MASSIVE serving was presented and it didn’t disappoint, with the soup quite spicy. If you keep up to date with my blog, I’m quite weak in that department. My mum doesn’t make this one, so I can’t really compare with homemade meals and cannot determine whether it’s the best BBH around, as others proclaim.

It was such a generous amount of soup that I couldn’t finish it all (for once). It was also served with an abundance of ingredients such as pig’s blood (brown, rectangular chunks – not visible in the photo) that you either will or will not like. To me, it doesn’t really taste like much but I find the texture a bit strange – like jelly, but softer.

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For dessert, we just went with a classic banana fritter that I couldn’t fault. We also ordered a lemonade, which we enjoyed as it was freshly made. This seems to be a good feature of their drinks. Since trying here, another friend has also said the pippies in XO sauce are quite good, so give them a try!

Not sure of their trading hours – the trouble with Asian restaurants, is the lack of their information online! Check their Urbanspoon for more reviews.

Song Huong on Urbanspoon

Laverton Rubble & Riches Market: Leakes Rd, Laverton

This one is a bit left of centre, as it is not a proper restaurant but rather a permanent stall at the weekend Laverton market. Their section usually has a fair share of seating area and they seem to have quite a large temporary kitchen for a weekend stall.

Don’t let the plastic chairs and takeaway atmosphere deceive you or put you off, as they are actually quite good and surprisingly serve quite a range of dishes from congee to banh mi (Vietnamese sandwich/baguette).

Whilst my friend had the bun bo hue (top right), which was full to the brim with excellent spicy broth, I went with xoi (sticky rice) with chinese sausage, egg, herbs and fried shallots. (Please ignore our Greek donuts in the middle!)

We also ordered the classic ca phe sua da or Vietnamese iced coffee. Needless to say these were downed quickly as well as the xoi, so much that we ordered another tub. For those who aren’t familiar with sticky rice, this one will look quite similar to normal rice but a bit more transparent. It clumps together, is a little harder and can have a bit of a sweeter taste depending on the dish. For these reasons I also find it a lot more filling. Thus, combined with the ingredients mentioned earlier, it makes a wholesome and interesting meal.

Laverton Market is open every weekend 7am-4pm. 

So hopefully this post has revealed some good Vietnamese places and dishes to eat. Where are your favourite Vietnamese places in Melbourne? (And please do not tell me Westernised-Asian dishes such as lemon chicken or Mongolian beef are your favourite Vietnamese dishes!!)

Authentic Vietnamese Spots

As a person of Vietnamese background, I would voice the usual opinion that a mother’s cooking is better compared to eating (Vietnamese food) out.

But when I do happen to eat out, here’s a few places that I’d recommend. To try authentic Vietnamese food, you’ll have to leave all preferences for atmosphere and ambience at the door. If you’re looking for good Vietnamese food, that’s what you’re going to get – no frills attached.

Pho Hung Vuong: Shop 2/15 Balmoral Avenue, Springvale

A favourite and popular joint amongst the shops in Springvale, this place is small but always packed and busy.

My parents once said if you’re going to eat pho out, you have to eat it at a shop that specialises in pho for it to be good (ie. not serve much else). Another thing they’ve taught us is that it’s all about the soup.

It’s always been a challenge to find pho that tastes just as good as my mum’s and I do feel that it is because of the fragant, flavoursome soup. However, Pho Hung Vuong proves that it is possible. I believe it’s because they brew their broth the same way that anyone would do at home, with various bones and herbs simmering in it, and have happened to figured out a consistent combination to satisfy the masses. On the other hand, my mum’s can taste a bit different every time.

It looks like your typical quick and straightforward Asian restaurant. You go in, sit down, order your meal and it will come out in a matter of minutes. It has the usual pho options (chicken, beef, beef balls) and I almost always go for the pho dac biet (special pho, above). The sizes generally range from about $7 or $8 up to $10.

There’s very little difference in price but in terms of size, even a small is generous enough to fill you up. Special pho has a little bit of everything – beef slices, tendon, tripe…I find that it is the solution to indecisiveness when ordering pho.

Pho is such a warming food, quite literally and figuratively. You know you will receive it quickly when you’re hungry, and it will be filling and of good quality at Hung Vuong. The soup is full of flavour, slightly sweet, and then everyone has their own preference of how to eat it thereon. Me? I enjoy a touch of chilli sauce, as much lemon as I can squeeze and lots of beanshoots and herbs. Pretty much everything I can to ensure it’s packed with flavour and exudes a pleasant and fragrant smell.

According to Urbanspoon, Pho Hung Vuong is open everyday. I don’t doubt this as I’ve even dropped in on public holidays to satisfy my pho cravings.

Pho Hung Vuong 2 on Urbanspoon

Song Huong: 71 Alfrieda St, St Albans

Who knew I could talk about pho for so long? Well if pho is all you associate with Vietnamese food, think again. We like our noodle soups and have a wide variety, so don’t be afraid to try the other ones. Each dish has a distinct taste, so I’ll let you in on two more.

Song Huong is similar to Pho Hung Vuong in that it is typically bland in decor as most fast, Asian places are. However, when seated you will be presented with an extensive menu of rice and noodle dishes. Their restaurant is also much larger, the size of two small shops combined, plus some outdoor seating.

On this occasion, I ordered bun rieu (top picture, bottom dish), a crab and tomato vermicelli noodle soup often with ingredients such as tofu and Vietnamese ham. I’ve tried my friend’s mum’s version of this dish and enjoyed it, thus was looking forward to having it at this popular westside restaurant.

It looked delicious, but I felt the soup was not as strong as what I’m used to. The flavour felt a little diluted compared to what I’ve had. Perhaps it could have had a bit more of a tomato taste. I can’t say it was bad, because without something to compare it to, I would probably enjoy it without a doubt. This is merely a case of it not tasting as good as a homemade meal!

I also ordered an avocado smoothie, a popular Vietnamese drink that I actually only discovered in Sydney. It tasted fresh, smooth and rich in avocado flavour, but for some reason I have a feeling the Sydney one tasted it better!

IMAG5445

Just as Pho Hung Vuong is known for their pho, Song Huong is apparently quite well-known for it’s bun bo hue (above), a spicy beef noodle soup, using thicker, cylindrical noodles. This time, I felt like I couldn’t leave without trying their specialty.

A MASSIVE serving was presented and it didn’t disappoint, with the soup quite spicy. If you keep up to date with my blog, I’m quite weak in that department. My mum doesn’t make this one, so I can’t really compare with homemade meals and cannot determine whether it’s the best BBH around, as others proclaim.

It was such a generous amount of soup that I couldn’t finish it all (for once). It was also served with an abundance of ingredients such as pig’s blood (brown, rectangular chunks – not visible in the photo) that you either will or will not like. To me, it doesn’t really taste like much but I find the texture a bit strange – like jelly, but softer.

IMAG5447

For dessert, we just went with a classic banana fritter that I couldn’t fault. We also ordered a lemonade, which we enjoyed as it was freshly made. This seems to be a good feature of their drinks. Since trying here, another friend has also said the pippies in XO sauce are quite good, so give them a try!

Not sure of their trading hours – the trouble with Asian restaurants, is the lack of their information online! Check their Urbanspoon for more reviews.

Song Huong on Urbanspoon

Laverton Rubble & Riches Market: Leakes Rd, Laverton

This one is a bit left of centre, as it is not a proper restaurant but rather a permanent stall at the weekend Laverton market. Their section usually has a fair share of seating area and they seem to have quite a large temporary kitchen for a weekend stall.

Don’t let the plastic chairs and takeaway atmosphere deceive you or put you off, as they are actually quite good and surprisingly serve quite a range of dishes from congee to banh mi (Vietnamese sandwich/baguette).

Whilst my friend had the bun bo hue (top right), which was full to the brim with excellent spicy broth, I went with xoi (sticky rice) with chinese sausage, egg, herbs and fried shallots. (Please ignore our Greek donuts in the middle!)

We also ordered the classic ca phe sua da or Vietnamese iced coffee. Needless to say these were downed quickly as well as the xoi, so much that we ordered another tub. For those who aren’t familiar with sticky rice, this one will look quite similar to normal rice but a bit more transparent. It clumps together, is a little harder and can have a bit of a sweeter taste depending on the dish. For these reasons I also find it a lot more filling. Thus, combined with the ingredients mentioned earlier, it makes a wholesome and interesting meal.

Laverton Market is open every weekend 7am-4pm. 

So hopefully this post has revealed some good Vietnamese places and dishes to eat. Where are your favourite Vietnamese places in Melbourne? (And please do not tell me Westernised-Asian dishes such as lemon chicken or Mongolian beef are your favourite Vietnamese dishes!!)